New site: Lincolnshire Furniture

Another site that went out a while ago and just wasn’t added here until now. Lincolnshire Furniture is a small business that (re-)creates custom furniture for homes and hospitality.

Lincolnshire Furniture

They don’t sell online, so there’s no e-commerce, but they do have a fairly large and interconnected catalog. This was a perfect opportunity to use Drupal (specifically the Panopoly distribution), tagging each product in its own page and setting up multiple views to display furniture by type, room, function, or a combination of those. Search functionality also comes with this CMS, naturally.

The theme used started off as one of those included in the distribution, but was modified to match the previous site as much as possible.

Drupal 8 release candidate

Finally, Drupal 8 left beta and provided a release candidate last week. As soon as things slow down at work, it’ll be time to start learning the ins and outs of this. (I won’t be moving away from Drupal 7 for some time, because of all the custom modules I’ve come to depend on. But that doesn’t mean my next project can’t start with the new version.)

Nine reasons NOT to use a CMS

This article is relevant to my interests. I’ve spent the last couple of months learning my way around Drupal 7 and the Panopoly distro (and waiting patiently for Drupal 8 to be ready to use), and it seems like every time I think I’ve finally got the hang of it, I find something new to try out.

Nevertheless, my employer’s primary marketing angle is that we create custom-built websites from scratch to meet our clients’ specific requirements, and I’m still the most comfortable when I can get straight into the HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP and SQL code to make things just right. Like it or not, using a CMS means accepting a few limitations. And with some clients, those limitations can be deal-breakers.